Electives

2019-20 Electives

2019-2020 Elective Course Offerings

Each year, Falmouth Academy offers a unique line-up of electives. Please click the link above to access a printable document or read through the offerings listed below.

Electives 2019-2020

All Falmouth Academy students must take at least one elective course each year. Students must complete two year-long arts electives in grades 9-12 as part of their graduation requirements. Courses that qualify to fulfill these requirements are marked (*).

Full Year Course that meets once a week

(*) Animate! Stop-Motion with Claymation & Video (grades 9-12)

In this course, students express their visual creativity through drawing, sculpting, constructing, and storytelling. Students will develop a concept, create a storyboard, and animate using stop-motion techniques with clay and other materials to create multimedia projects. Students have an option to use a cell phone, iPad, or a DSLR camera to capture images. Through experimentation and basic techniques for character design they will study how to make a subject have a natural flow, and movement will be explored. Through exploration of various programs such as Adobe Spark, Adobe Rush, Adobe Photoshop CC, and Adobe Premier Pro students will learn to animate as they work both in teams and individually.

(*) Ceramics, Beginning (grades 8-12)

Students use the Elements and Principles of Art (line, form, space, texture, color) to explore a variety of techniques, using clay. They learn the basics of handbuilding: slab, pinch, coil, proper wedging and attaching, glazing, recycling and firing. They try Sgraffito and slip trailing and make ringed “feet” on their pots. Emphasis is on proper technique, experimentation with design, and the creative process. Students are asked to find creative solutions for their problems.

(*) Ceramics, Advanced (grades 9-12)

The Advanced students participate in a Raku workshop twice a year. Raku is a Japanese method of firing done in an outdoor kiln, using a gas fire. The class emphasizes experimentation and being willing to “fail” to learn something new. Students begin to “lift” taller and thinner pots. Students are excited to see the products of their labors when a glaze fire comes out of the kiln. A field trip to view art and exemplary ceramics is taken every autumn. “Advanced students” are students who have had Ceramics class more than once. The Advanced class has second, third and fourth year students in it. They are encouraged to watch videos and emulate making pots like the master ceramicists. They are also encouraged to look at Ceramics Monthly magazine and try new ideas.

(*) Chorus, Boys’

In the Boys’ Chorus, healthy vocal technique and fundamental theory skills are taught through a rehearsal process that draws upon a wide variety of repertoire, from sea shanties, to Gregorian chants, to doo-wop, and much more. Singers are

welcome whether their voice have changed or not - in fact, learning to sing correctly while approaching adolescence is key for a lifetime of vocal growth and enjoyment. The Boys’ Chorus also sings combined pieces with the Girls’ Chorus throughout the year. Performances include Falmouth Academy Music Department concerts, programs for local nursing homes and clubs, and Falmouth Academy Graduation.

Chorus members may participate in adjudicated choral festivals; guest artists may visit. All singers are encouraged to participate in regional and state choral festivals. Some weekly practice is expected. Open to male students in all grades.

(*) Chorus, Girls’

Singers in the Girls’ Chorus develop healthy vocal technique, learn musical skills, and gain personal confidence while making wonderful music and bonding together as an ensemble. Musical selections are drawn from a variety of periods and styles, including classical, folk, world music, jazz, Broadway, and contemporary. The Girls’ Chorus also sings combined pieces with the Boys’ Chorus throughout the year.

Performances include Falmouth Academy Music Department concerts, programs for local nursing homes and clubs, and Falmouth Academy Graduation. Chorus members may participate in adjudicated choral festivals; guest artists may visit. All singers are encouraged to participate in regional and state choral festivals. Some weekly practice is expected. Open to female students in all grades.

(*) Drama, Introduction to / Middle School Play

The Middle School Play Drama elective is a student’s chance to participate in the Middle School Play. Students learn all the basics of performance while creating their very own original show which is performed in our school's theater in February. This elective emphasizes improvisation, character-building theater games, creative playwriting, and performance technique. Students work together collaboratively, creating a safe environment where all voices are heard and there are no bad ideas. This elective meets weekly as a regular elective throughout the year, but has a mandatory after-school rehearsal schedule MON-THURS during the month of January. Students participating are also agreeing to be available for tech and dress rehearsals as well as workdays.

(*) Drama, Advanced

In this class, student actors focus on advanced improvisation techniques, as well as scenes and monologues, touching on a variety of historical eras. Actors learn about theatrical styles from other periods in history and how to apply these styles to their improvisational scenes. Students also perform selected scripts to further study various styles. There is an increased focus on vocal and physical preparation in this class, as well. Whenever possible, Advanced Drama students view live performances, both in and out of school, and analyze the effectiveness of the choices made by actors, directors, and designers. Students may take this class multiple times, as the special projects rotate through the years. Open to students in grades 9- 12.

(*) Drawing, Introduction to (grades 7-12) (limit: 12 students)

This course, designed for students with little or no formal training in drawing, will focus on the tradition techniques of draftsmanship. The emphasis is on accurately translating what the eye perceives onto paper. Projects and themes include contour drawing, creating a dynamic composition, negative space, scaling & amp; proportion, reductive drawing, six divisions of light, one- and two-point perspective, and how to draw from a photograph. Materials include graphite, charcoal, pastels, colored pencils, and ink. No prerequisite.

(*) Drawing, Advanced (grades 8-12) (limit: 12 students)

The emphasis of this course is on exploring abstract ideas and modes of communication. In the advanced course, there is an equal emphasis on process and product. As opposed to the introductory class, students are encouraged to consider drawing beyond a physical representation of the world. Students are continually encouraged to push their boundaries and try new materials and techniques.

Students will begin to ask (and maybe even answer) questions like, “what makes a drawing good or bad?” and “is a work still successful if it does not look like what I intended?” and “how does the form of my work relate to the ideas I am trying to communicate?” Materials include charcoal, colored pencils, Prismacolor markers, ink, graphite, and pastels. Prerequisite: Introduction to Drawing.

(*) Film, Introduction to/Advanced

Students in this elective study the art of film: acting for the camera, screenwriting, cinematography, editing, production design, directing, and producing. They learn how to spot homages to earlier films and trends in multiple productions. They learn how to watch movies with a discerning eye and to discuss classics and modern films, paying close attention to how the historical context, the artists’ goals, the technology, and the various film disciplines have influenced filmmakers’ choices.

They also do special projects such as creating their own stop-motion short films, researching and presenting an analysis of a particular director’s style and themes, analyzing adaptations, and writing, filming, and editing a short film. May be repeated for credit.

(*) Instrumental Ensemble Mixed

Students will study basic music theory, scales, and chords as well as the art of performing in an ensemble. The classics, pop and jazz selections are standard fare. Students are encouraged to take private lessons to keep pace with the group.

(*) Instrumental Ensemble, Advanced

Students will learn music theory, scales, and chords as well as performing in an ensemble setting learning the fine art of music at an advanced level. Students are encouraged to take private lessons to be able to keep pace with the group. This group performs regularly outside of the school environs in the community and while on tour every June in Northern New England.

Interconnected Biology

This advanced biology elective aims to explore biology through comparative anatomy and physiology in order to better understand how the structure and function of our own anatomy and physiology is reflected throughout the natural world. This class will provide students the opportunity to do some advanced level animal dissections. The elective is open to any freshman, sophomore, junior or senior student with an interest in the biological sciences who has not previously enrolled in the elective.

Latin, Beginning

This course is for students who are interested in learning the basics of the Latin language and various topics concerning the Roman World. Emphasis is put on Latin vocabulary and grammar and how these relate to modern languages. Some time is also spent in discussing Ancient Greek, the heroic age, Greek and Roman mythology, and the influence of Eastern religions on the Mediterranean world. Students in Beginning Latin will have the opportunity to participate in the National Latin Exam in March and are also encouraged to join the FA trip to Rome or Greece (held every three or four years).

Latin, Advanced

This higher level Latin course is for students who have previously studied Latin. The class is tailored to the interests and backgrounds of the students and puts particular emphasis on being able to appreciate Latin literature in the original language. A great course for the student who wants to understand that “carpe diem” should not be translated as “seize the day,” and that “alumni” can be used with any group that contains at least one man. Students in Advanced Latin will have the opportunity to participate in the National Latin Exam in March and are also encouraged to join the FA trip to Rome or Greece (held every three or four years). Open to students in all grades with Beginning Latin as a prerequisite.

Mullen Hall Volunteering (grades 9-12)

Students in grades 9 through 12 have the opportunity to volunteer each week at the nearby Mullen -Hall School (Grades K-4). Students will be paired with a classroom to work with over the course of the year. During their weekly visit to the school, Falmouth Academy students will assist the classroom teacher in a variety of ways, which will vary from week to week. They may work with a group or with an individual student on classroom work, art, or poetry projects, among other possibilities. Students also have the opportunity to work with first grade classes in the Mullen-Hall Learning Garden on garden-based activities, such as planting, tending, and harvesting.

(*) Musical Theatre

Students study the elements of musical theatre: singing, dancing, and acting, as well as the production styles of musical theatre performances. Typically, they learn about the history of musical theatre in America and discuss and practice the different styles that have developed from the Golden Age to the modern era. They work on

creating specialized characters, presentational acting styles, singing solos, and duets (non-singers need not be afraid!), dancing, and choreography. They also read scripts, listen to soundtracks, and watch performances. No previous experience necessary. Open to all grades. May be repeated for credit.

(*) Painting, Introduction to (grades 8-12) (limit: 12 students)

Introduction to Painting is designed for beginning painting students with experience in drawing techniques. This class is devoted to observational painting, and nearly all of the assignments and exercises are working from life. The course is designed to be sequential in that we begin with the fundamentals and build on these skills throughout the year. The emphasis is on process, not product. Exercises in class include color theory via color mixing, underpainting, value studies, and painting from a still life. Suggested prerequisite: Introduction to Drawing.

(*) Painting, Advanced (grades 9-12) (limit: 12 students)

The emphasis of this course is on exploring abstract ideas and modes of communication via paint. Students will apply their technical knowledge of drawing and painting learned in the introductory courses to create more sophisticated and thoughtful works of art. Students have the opportunity to work from observation as well as from their imagination, and materials include acrylic, watercolor, and pastel. In the advanced courses, there is an equal emphasis on the process of making work as well as the final product. Prerequisite: Introduction to Painting, additional suggested prerequisite: Introduction to Drawing.

(*) Photography, Introduction to

Through the lens of a 35mm film camera, Introduction to Photography offers students a new way to see and control light. They learn how to use a camera, develop film, and print in the darkroom. Projects include: the camera obscura, various shooting assignments on and off campus, and exposure to other photographers, both contemporary and historical. Students build on technique and vision. In-school 35mm loaner cameras are available.

Spring term students will be introduced to Adobe Photoshop CC and digital photography as a preview for Intermediate Photography. No digital camera is necessary.

(*) Photography, Intermediate (Prerequisite: Introduction to Photography)

With a knowledge of camera basics, Intermediate Photography students complete assignments designed to build on vision and technique. Both traditional darkroom and digital projects using Adobe Photoshop will be covered. Students have the

option to work in one or both mediums. Projects include challenges in seeing in new and unique ways; book binding; and assignments covering nature, sports, fashion, reportage, commercial, and environmental portraiture. Students will choose a contemporary or historical photographer to research, create a presentation in Slideshow, and present it to the class.

(*) Photography, Advanced (Prerequisite: Intermediate Photography)

Given their acquired base of Intro and Intermediate Photography classes, students are able to take their work to the next level. They’ll develop a personal vision and experiment with technique, make slideshow presentations of historical and contemporary photographers, create a solo-exhibition in the gallery, try alternative darkroom techniques, learn how to critique the photographic image, and create a final video project. Students can choose between darkroom and digital photography.

(*) Printmaking (grades 8-12) (limit: 12 students; prerequisite: Introduction to Drawing)

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of printmaking, beginning with monotypes, drypoint etching, relief printing, and screen printing. Students will review the principles of design and learn how to create dynamic images with a focus on graphic design. In addition to print editions on paper, students will have the opportunity to create prints for stationery, t-shirts, and bags.

Python Programming / Programming, Introduction to

Python is often listed as one of the top 5 programming language learn, just (but not by much) behind Java and C. Python uses natural language (print means print) and is easy to both read and understand. But don’t be fooled by its simplicity; it is also used with Artificial Intelligence (AI), robotics, and is in high demand in the job field. In this course you will use the Python function library and specialized modules to construct programs that interact with the user, control electrical components, process data, draw images, and much more. Prior experience in programming is not necessary.

(*) Rock Band

Students will learn how to make music by reading and by ear. They will study chord and song structure of rock tunes as well as the classics and jazz. Basic music theory will be taught and integrated into the lessons including knowledge of chords, scales, and ensemble playing.

(*) Stagecraft (limit: 8 students)

Students will learn the basics of technical theater: sets, lights, properties, costumes, and sound. The class focus is on the three school plays done during the school year; students in the stagecraft classes form the core of the student stage crew for both the plays and the school concerts. Students learn how to use basic hand tools including electric drills, to paint sets, and to make props, to hang and focus lights, to operate the lighting board and sound equipment when required. Open to students in all grades.

(*) String Ensemble

Students will learn music theory, scales, and chords as well as performing in an ensemble setting learning the fine art of music at an advanced level. Students are encouraged to take private lessons to be able to keep pace with the group.

(*) Woodworking (grades 9-12, limit: 5 students)

Through a series of independent and group projects, students will learn how to safely work with a variety of hand and power tools to construct projects of their own design.

(*) Yearbook

In the Yearbook elective, students produce the annual yearbook publication (Mainsail) as a pictorial history of campus activities and memorable events for the current school year. They are required to create page layouts, take photographs, and write brief descriptions of events. Students also learn how to use Jostens Yearbook Avenue, an online yearbook system, to upload photos and edit yearbook pages. Each student will be assigned certain pages to work on and will be required to meet assigned deadlines.

Yoga

The teenage years often have lots of stressful conditions from schoolwork, social anxiety, peer or parental pressure, and the future looming ahead. A yoga class during the day offers students a chance to work their bodies while giving their minds a break. Students will learn how to slow down while warming up!

Full Year Course that students may add or drop at trimester breaks

Beekeeping (limit: 8)

Students will assist in the management of the school’s honeybee hives. Through a series of experiments and hands-on activities in the bee yard, kitchen, and woodshop, the course provides students with a closer look at the life cycle of honeybees, a chance to work with products of the hive, and an opportunity to understand some of the challenges that bees are facing today.

Chess Club

Chess club is an activity that will give students an opportunity to learn the game of chess, improve their chess skills, and to enjoy competition against their peers. New players will be taught the basic rules, the value of pieces, and how to checkmate.

More experienced players will learn different opening and defense strategies as well as various chess tactics. While students will have the chance to measure their progress through playing against each other, the main focus will be on encouraging good sportsmanship and on having fun.

Creative Writing & Literary Magazine

Calling all Creative Writers! Throughout the year, we will write and workshop many genres of writing including poetry, short stories, personal narratives, and drama. We mix in games, contests, and studies of famous writers. During the first trimester, the course focuses primarily on producing and workshopping in-class projects. During second and third trimesters, we turn our attention towards the production and publication of Resonance, FA’s literary magazine. This course is limited to 12 students with preference given to high school students.

Engage: Service Local and Global

Members of the ‘Engage’ elective will have opportunities to make a difference by actively volunteering in the Falmouth community and by leading the school community in various service and charitable projects of their choosing. Students will also have the chance to partner in the Human Rights initiative in conjunction with the Barnstable County Human Rights Academy.

Farm and Garden Arts

Farm and Garden Arts is a hands-on elective where students learn about proper practices and techniques involved with planning, planting, pruning, and culture of the ornamental landscape, fruit, and vegetable gardening. They learn how to identify native and invasive species and how to help to minimize the spread of the latter. The school has a small vegetable garden and a 14 x 24 ft. greenhouse that is used to start seedlings and grow a variety of vegetables throughout the year. The elective also helps to maintain a small fruit orchard with a dozen pear trees and half a dozen grape vines. Hardscape construction with stone, brick, or timber is also introduced when repairs or installations are necessary. Falmouth Academy also has a small flock of layer hens that offers an introduction to chicken management. Visits to Peterson Farm, Spohr Gardens and other local gardens to volunteer and learn about different animals and garden styles are regular annual field trips.

Fitness for Life

This elective meets once weekly during fourth period. The class meets at the Falmouth Sports Center. Students in the Fitness for Life class have access to the health facility. Students use an unparalleled variety of strength and fitness equipment. Students are required to monitor their personal fitness plan throughout the year. Participants are also required to submit their activity sheet at the end of each trimester.

(*) Graphic Design, Intro to

This elective will introduce students to Adobe InDesign and Illustrator, graphic design, and page layout software applications that provide the tools to combine students’ skills with their artistic side. The course will explore the principles of design, combining and laying out font for maximum impact, working with images and vector files, and creating dynamic images for the web. The elective will be completely hands-on. A few of the design challenges may include brochures, posters, business cards, postcards, and magazine layouts in both print and digital format.

Literary Criticism, Analysis, and Joyful Discussion

The course will feature the reading and discussing of short essays, or portions of longer literary works. The plan for the course is that students will devote the first third of the 70-minute block to reading a chosen short essay, which will then be collectively discussed and analyzed over the remaining time. The initial list of authors includes George Orwell, Christopher Hitchens, Paul Fussell, Noah Harari. E. B White, and Mark Twain, but there will be many others. Chosen essays will deal with a variety of themes and genres; certainly social, moral, historical, and philosophical topics will be explored, but perhaps science themes as well. In a real sense, the course is envisioned as a weekly micro “book club” experience with a weekly short essay taking the place of a longer work.

Small-Space Indoor Gardening

This elective is designed to instill, or enhance, a student’s interest in growing plants. Indoor gardening is a way to enjoy growing plants your ‘round, a way to produce some of your own food, and a way to enhance the healthiness and attractiveness of your living space. We will learn about different types of plants that can be grown indoors, how to propagate in different ways, and how to control the growth cycle.

Possible extensions/additions include: (1) working in the wood shop to construct an assembly to allow simple vertical gardening, and (2) working in the ceramics room to construct suitable, plant-specific containers.

Interconnected Biology

This advanced biology elective aims to explore biology through comparative anatomy and physiology in order to better understand how the structure and function of our own anatomy and physiology is reflected throughout the natural world. This class will provide students the opportunity to do some advanced level animal dissections. The elective is open to any freshman, sophomore, junior or senior student with an interest in the biological sciences who has not previously enrolled in the elective.

Latin, Beginning

This course is for students who are interested in learning the basics of the Latin language and various topics concerning the Roman World. Emphasis is put on Latin vocabulary and grammar and how these relate to modern languages. Some time is also spent in discussing Ancient Greek, the heroic age, Greek and Roman mythology, and the influence of Eastern religions on the Mediterranean world. Students in Beginning Latin will have the opportunity to participate in the National Latin Exam in March and are also encouraged to join the FA trip to Rome or Greece (held every three or four years).

Latin, Advanced

This higher level Latin course is for students who have previously studied Latin. The class is tailored to the interests and backgrounds of the students and puts particular emphasis on being able to appreciate Latin literature in the original language. A great course for the student who wants to understand that “carpe diem” should not be translated as “seize the day,” and that “alumni” can be used with any group that contains at least one man. Students in Advanced Latin will have the opportunity to participate in the National Latin Exam in March and are also encouraged to join the FA trip to Rome or Greece (held every three or four years). Open to students in all grades with Beginning Latin as a prerequisite.

Mullen Hall Volunteering (grades 9-12)

Students in grades 9 through 12 have the opportunity to volunteer each week at the nearby Mullen -Hall School (Grades K-4). Students will be paired with a classroom to work with over the course of the year. During their weekly visit to the school, Falmouth Academy students will assist the classroom teacher in a variety of ways, which will vary from week to week. They may work with a group or with an individual student on classroom work, art, or poetry projects, among other possibilities. Students also have the opportunity to work with first grade classes in the Mullen-Hall Learning Garden on garden-based activities, such as planting, tending, and harvesting.

(*) Musical Theatre

Students study the elements of musical theatre: singing, dancing, and acting, as well as the production styles of musical theatre performances. Typically, they learn about the history of musical theatre in America and discuss and practice the different styles that have developed from the Golden Age to the modern era. They work on creating specialized characters, presentational acting styles, singing solos and duets (non-singers need not be afraid!), dancing, and choreography. They also read scripts, listen to soundtracks, and watch performances. No previous experience necessary. Open to all grades. May be repeated for credit.

(*) Painting, Introduction to (grades 8-12) (limit: 12 students)

Introduction to Painting is designed for beginning painting students with experience in drawing techniques. This class is devoted to observational painting, and nearly all of the assignments and exercises are working from life. The course is designed to be sequential in that we begin with the fundamentals and build on these skills throughout the year. The emphasis is on process, not product. Exercises in class include color theory via color mixing, underpainting, value studies, and painting from a still life. Suggested prerequisite: Introduction to Drawing.

(*) Painting, Advanced (grades 9-12) (limit: 12 students)

The emphasis of this course is on exploring abstract ideas and modes of communication via paint. Students will apply their technical knowledge of drawing and painting learned in the introductory courses to create more sophisticated and thoughtful works of art. Students have the opportunity to work from observation as well as from their imagination, and materials include acrylic, watercolor, and pastel. In the advanced courses, there is an equal emphasis on the process of making work as well as the final product. Prerequisite: Introduction to Painting, additional suggested prerequisite: Introduction to Drawing.

(*) Photography, Introduction to

Through the lens of a 35mm film camera, Introduction to Photography offers students a new way to see and control light. They learn how to use a camera, develop film, and print in the darkroom. Projects include: the camera obscura, various shooting assignments on and off campus, and exposure to other photographers, both contemporary and historical. Students build on technique and vision. In-school 35mm loaner cameras are available.

Spring term students will be introduced to Adobe Photoshop CC and digital photography as a preview for Intermediate Photography. No digital camera is necessary.

(*) Photography, Intermediate (Prerequisite: Introduction to Photography)

With a knowledge of camera basics, Intermediate Photography students complete assignments designed to build on vision and technique. Both traditional darkroom and digital projects using Adobe Photoshop will be covered. Students have the

option to work in one or both mediums. Projects include challenges in seeing in new and unique ways; book binding; and assignments covering nature, sports, fashion, reportage, commercial, and environmental portraiture. Students will choose a contemporary or historical photographer to research, create a presentation in Slideshow, and present it to the class.

(*) Photography, Advanced (Prerequisite: Intermediate Photography)

Given their acquired base of Intro and Intermediate Photography classes, students are able to take their work to the next level. They’ll develop a personal vision and experiment with technique, make slideshow presentations of historical and contemporary photographers, create a solo-exhibition in the gallery, try alternative darkroom techniques, learn how to critique the photographic image, and create a final video project. Students can choose between darkroom and digital photography.

(*) Printmaking (grades 8-12) (limit: 12 students; prerequisite: Introduction to Drawing)

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of printmaking, beginning with monotypes, drypoint etching, relief printing, and screen printing. Students will review the principles of design and learn how to create dynamic images with a focus on graphic design. In addition to print editions on paper, students will have the opportunity to create prints for stationery, t-shirts, and bags.

Python Programming / Programming, Introduction to

Python is often listed as one of the top 5 programming language learn, just (but not by much) behind Java and C. Python uses natural language (print means print) and is easy to both read and understand. But don’t be fooled by its simplicity; it is also used with Artificial Intelligence (AI), robotics, and is in high demand in the job field. In this course you will use the Python function library and specialized modules to construct programs that interact with the user, control electrical components, process data, draw images, and much more. Prior experience in programming is not necessary.

(*) Rock Band

Students will learn how to make music by reading and by ear. They will study chord and song structure of rock tunes as well as the classics and jazz. Basic music theory will be taught and integrated into the lessons including knowledge of chords, scales, and ensemble playing.

(*) Stagecraft (limit: 8 students)

Students will learn the basics of technical theater: sets, lights, properties, costumes, and sound. The class focus is on the three school plays done during the school year; students in the stagecraft classes form the core of the student stage crew for both the plays and the school concerts. Students learn how to use basic hand tools including electric drills, to paint sets, and to make props, to hang and focus lights, to operate the lighting board and sound equipment when required. Open to students in all grades.

(*) String Ensemble

Students will learn music theory, scales, and chords as well as performing in an ensemble setting learning the fine art of music at an advanced level. Students are encouraged to take private lessons to be able to keep pace with the group.

(*) Woodworking (grades 9-12, limit: 5 students)

Through a series of independent and group projects, students will learn how to safely work with a variety of hand and power tools to construct projects of their own design.

(*) Yearbook

In the Yearbook elective, students produce the annual yearbook publication (Mainsail) as a pictorial history of campus activities and memorable events for the current school year. They are required to create page layouts, take photographs, and write brief descriptions of events. Students also learn how to use Jostens Yearbook Avenue, an online yearbook system, to upload photos and edit yearbook pages. Each student will be assigned certain pages to work on and will be required to meet assigned deadlines.

Yoga

The teenage years often have lots of stressful conditions from schoolwork, social anxiety, peer or parental pressure, and the future looming ahead. A yoga class during the day offers students a chance to work their bodies while giving their minds a break. Students will learn how to slow down while warming up!

Full Year Course that students may add or drop at trimester breaks

Beekeeping (limit: 8)

Students will assist in the management of the school’s honeybee hives. Through a series of experiments and hands-on activities in the bee yard, kitchen, and woodshop, the course provides students with a closer look at the life cycle of honeybees, a chance to work with products of the hive, and an opportunity to understand some of the challenges that bees are facing today.

Chess Club

Chess club is an activity that will give students an opportunity to learn the game of chess, improve their chess skills, and to enjoy competition against their peers. New players will be taught the basic rules, the value of pieces, and how to checkmate.

More experienced players will learn different opening and defense strategies as well as various chess tactics. While students will have the chance to measure their progress through playing against each other, the main focus will be on encouraging good sportsmanship and on having fun.

Creative Writing & Literary Magazine (grades 9-12)

Calling all Creative Writers! Throughout the year, we will write and workshop many genres of writing including poetry, short stories, personal narratives, and drama. We mix in games, contests, and studies of famous writers. During the first trimester, the course focuses primarily on producing and workshopping in-class projects. During

the second and third trimesters, we turn our attention towards the production and publication of Resonance, FA’s literary magazine. This course is limited to 12 students with preference given to high school students.

Engage: Service Local and Global

Members of the ‘Engage’ elective will have opportunities to make a difference by actively volunteering in the Falmouth community and by leading the school community in various service and charitable projects of their choosing. Students will also have the chance to partner in the Human Rights initiative in conjunction with the Barnstable County Human Rights Academy.

Farm and Garden Arts

Farm and Garden Arts is a hands-on elective where students learn about proper practices and techniques involved with planning, planting, pruning, and culture of the ornamental landscape, fruit, and vegetable gardening. They learn how to identify native and invasive species and how to help to minimize the spread of the latter. The school has a small vegetable garden and a 14 x 24 ft. greenhouse that is used to start seedlings and grow a variety of vegetables throughout the year. The elective also helps to maintain a small fruit orchard with a dozen pear trees and half a dozen grape vines. Hardscape construction with stone, brick, or timber is also introduced when repairs or installations are necessary. Falmouth Academy also has a small flock of layer hens that offers an introduction to chicken management. Visits to Peterson Farm, Spohr Gardens and other local gardens to volunteer and learn about different animals and garden styles are regular annual field trips.

Fitness for Life

This elective meets once weekly during fourth period. The class meets at the Falmouth Sports Center. Students in the Fitness for Life class have access to the health facility. Students use an unparalleled variety of strength and fitness equipment. Students are required to monitor their personal fitness plan throughout the year. Participants are also required to submit their activity sheet at the end of each trimester.

(*) Graphic Design, Intro to

This elective will introduce students to Adobe InDesign and Illustrator, graphic design, and page layout software applications that provide the tools to combine students’ skills with their artistic side. The course will explore the principles of design, combining and laying out font for maximum impact, working with images and vector files, and creating dynamic images for the web. The elective will be completely hands-on. A few of the design challenges may include brochures, posters, business cards, postcards, and magazine layouts in both print and digital format.

Literary Criticism, Analysis, and Joyful Discussion

The course will feature the reading and discussing of short essays, or portions of longer literary works. The plan for the course is that students will devote the first third of the 70-minute block to reading a chosen short essay, which will then be

collectively discussed and analyzed over the remaining time. The initial list of authors includes George Orwell, Christopher Hitchens, Paul Fussell, Noah Harari. E. B White, and Mark Twain, but there will be many others. Chosen essays will deal with a variety of themes and genres; certainly social, moral, historical, and philosophical topics will be explored, but perhaps science themes as well. In a real sense, the course is envisioned as a weekly micro “book club” experience with a weekly short essay taking the place of a longer work.

Small-Space Indoor Gardening

This elective is designed to instill, or enhance, a student’s interest in growing plants. Indoor gardening is a way to enjoy growing plants your ‘round, a way to produce some of your own food, and a way to enhance the healthiness and attractiveness of your living space. We will learn about different types of plants that can be grown indoors, how to propagate in different ways, and how to control the growth cycle.

Possible extensions/additions include: (1) working in the wood shop to construct an assembly to allow simple vertical gardening, and (2) working in the ceramics room to construct suitable, plant-specific containers.

Trimester-long Courses

T1

Forensic Science T1 (grades 9-12))

Forensic science is a dynamic and interactive course where students can learn the ins and outs of being a forensic scientist. In the first trimester they are put in the role of a criminal investigator collecting evidence and mapping crime scenes. In the second trimester students are lab technicians analyzing evidence such as handwriting, fingerprints, and blood spatter. In the third trimester participants are expert witnesses testifying in the courtroom.

Recreational Games T1

This elective allows students to participate in a variety of recreational activities based on interests. Students play Basketball, Flag Football, Capture The Flag, Soccer, Volleyball, Team Handball, Swamp Ball, Kickball, Wiffleball, Badminton, Castle Ball, and Dodge Ball along with a variety of games of low organization.

Social Psychology: The Environment That Shapes Us

How do our social interactions and environments shape our common behaviors and beliefs? How do our individual actions shape the experience for those around us?

Social psychology is the discipline within psychology used to explain these experiences. This trimester long course will provide an introductory understanding to this intriguing field. Students will explore the fluidity and potential power of social influences through interactive seminars, conducting social psych exercises, and relevant readings.

T1 and/or T2 and/or T3

Volunteering at JML Care Center

Students in the JML elective engage in a variety of activities with the elderly residents at JML. These activities can include playing games, reading to the residents, helping them with email or cell phones, and unstructured conversation, among many others. JML is located adjacent to the FA campus, so the students walk to the Center and back in good weather. Faculty members drive the students when the weather is cold or rainy.

T1 + T2 (or year round)

Curling (grades 9-12)

Sweep! Hard! Hard! Wondering what these terms mean and how they affect a stone on ice? Curious why the sport is called curling? Interested in learning how to play a truly lifelong sport? In this elective, students will be able to walk to the Cape Cod Curling Club during fourth period in order to learn the rules, techniques, and strategies of curling.

T1 + T3

Identity, Power, and Privilege: Windows into Modern American Culture

In American culture, which identity groups inherited power, came into power, or have lost power? Which identity groups have the role of granting others access or permission? How do these social constructs shape modern American culture, both on a national level and in our local communities? Using research, discussions, current writings, relevant media, and self discoveries, students will immerse in learning about identities, both individual and group, and the interdependent relationship between identities and systems of power and privilege. Diving even deeper into these complex relationships, students will explore agents of change, the driving energy behind these movements, and the potential cultural responses.

T2

Forensic Science (T2) (grades 9-12)) (prerequisite: Forensic Science T1) Forensic science is a dynamic and interactive course where students can learn the ins and outs of being a forensic scientist. In the first trimester they are put in the role of a criminal investigator collecting evidence and mapping crime scenes. In the second trimester students are lab technicians analyzing evidence such as handwriting, fingerprints, and blood spatter. In the third trimester participants are expert witnesses testifying in the courtroom.

Recreational Games T2: Volleyball/Badminton

Participants will play and develop skills to play and understand strategies of both Volleyball and Badminton. This elective will run for one trimester.

Volleyball: An introductory course in the fundamentals of volleyball including passing, serving, setting and spiking. Students will learn rules and court strategy for playing the game. Emphasis will be on total fitness and recreational skills for leisure and lifetime activities.

Badminton: Designed for the student who has little or no experience in the game of badminton. The course places major emphasis on the rules, terminology, and the basic fundamentals necessary for participation in badminton at the beginning level.

Tai Chi

Students can defy winter blues by adding Tai Chi to their second trimester course schedule! Tai Chi is an ancient Chinese martial art that embraces the Yin and the Yang (opposing forces interdependent with one another). This class will explore the short form of Tai Chi Chuan, which links twelve individual movements into one fluid form. This relaxing form of exercise has vast benefits to health and wellbeing, and best of all, it is fun to learn! Coupled with Qigong (breath work), Tai Chi is a healthy stress-reducing outlet students are likely to enjoy in and out of class.

T2 + T3

Cognitive Psychology

Inquisitive minds welcomed! How do we make decisions? How can two different people interpret the same experience in dramatically different ways? Is there a limit to how much our memory can improve? Cognitive psychology is the discipline within psychology that explores how our thinking, reasoning, memory, and perception impact our beliefs and behaviors. This trimester long course will discuss styles of learning, judgment, attention and focus, and other fascinating thought processes as we explore the inner workings of human mind through discussion, current research, and self-discovery.

T3

Forensic Science T3 (grades 9-12)) (prerequisite: T2)

Forensic science is a dynamic and interactive course where students can learn the ins and outs of being a forensic scientist. In the first trimester they are put in the role of a criminal investigator collecting evidence and mapping crime scenes. In the second trimester students are lab technicians analyzing evidence such as handwriting, fingerprints, and blood spatter. In the third trimester participants are expert witnesses testifying in the courtroom.

Recreational Games T3: Games of Low Organization

The main purposes of low organizational games are to maximize game play and participation of all players, to create an environment that encourages fair play and emphasizes the importance of fitness, teamwork and fun while developing at least one game skill and body management skill. Games will be similar to Recreational Games.